Kentucky court rules Christian printer has religious right to discriminate

In a ruling that signals the end of a first amendment court battle that began more than five years ago, the Kentucky court of appeals ruled a Christian printer in Lexington, Ky., was within his rights to refuse to take an order to print Pride T-shirts for that city’s LGBTQ celebration.

It’s a victory not only for Blaine Adamson, the owner of Hands on Originals, but also for his lawyers from the Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative Christian group that opposes same-sex marriage and adoption by same-sex couples. They argued that he refused to print the shirts for the 2012 festival because it was against his religious beliefs.

“Americans should always have the freedom to believe, the freedom to express those beliefs, and the freedom to not express ideas that would violate their conscience,” said Jim Campbell, the senior ADF attorney who argued before the appeals court in December of last year. “Today’s decision is a victory for printers and other creative professionals who serve all people but cannot promote all messages. It is also a victory for all Americans because it reassures us all that, no matter what you believe, the law can’t force you to express a message in conflict with your deepest convictions.”

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